Kristina Kehrer

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Kristina M Kehrer

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Doing my best to capture the heart, soul, and essence of people, who then get to shine brightly on Cambridge Community Television. This in turn fills me with a great joy and satisfaction. I have lived many incarnations in Cambridge, Mass since 1986.

Stories by Kristina Kehrer

F.J. Doyle & Co. also known as Doyle’s Café in Jamaica Plain has a Wikipedia page. It is that famous. In the most notoriously Boston way, it is famous for beer and politics.

When I saw my first one, I thought it was a sweatshirt that CRLS was handing out to the kids in one of its clubs. But then I started seeing more of them and not just on teenagers, but also on people of all ages. I am referring to the t-shirt/sweatshirt that proudly reads “Just a Kid from Cambridge.”

Before Annie Lennox of the Eurythmics was famous, she used to wait tables in New York City. Imagine the thrill of being served Spaghetti Bolognese by someone who would soon become an international rock star.

Although the game of fame has changed drastically over the decades, one thing remains the same; you never know what plethora of talent your waiter or barista may be dishing out when their shift is over.

On Saturday, August 19, the last thing I had time to do was to go to the Boston Common to fight the ridiculous and never-ending battle against racism, hate, and white supremacy. I am sure that 40,000 of my co-conspirators felt the same way.

I know of two beehives in my neighborhood, which is good considering the buzz on bees is they are in danger of extinction.

I made the mistake of googling my opening line “everything happens at once,” and became completely distracted with the physicists' theory that “The concept of time is simply an illusion made up of human memories, everything that has ever been and ever will be is happening RIGHT NOW."

I haven’t seen the most comedy of anyone ever, but I have seen a lot. I’m a tough audience and that is not because my standards are too high, but more a reflection of America’s descent into mediocrity. That being said, I consider Standup Comedy to be one of the hardest art forms out there.

To be alone on a stage with a single microphone under the harsh glare of a spotlight with all eyes upon you, demanding that you make them laugh. I cringe at the thought of it. But people do it, and they make a life of it. Valeria Dikovitskaya aka Vally D is one such person.

While strolling around Salem, MA, Emily Wieja, a member of the Cambridge Citizens for Smokers’ Rights political action group, came across a nifty public ashtray for the disposal of cigarette butts called, the Sidewalk Buttler.

It was one of those nights. I didn’t want to leave the house. The snarled, rude, rush hour traffic, coupled with a lack of parking in Central Square, confirmed my mood. I was asked to film a tap dance performance at the Dance Complex, and the thought of banging metal shoes on a wood floor was not conducive to my bad mood. I was braced for agony.

I couldn’t have been more wrong.

On May 4, 2017, the Harvard Book Store was standing room only for “Kill It To Save It” author Corey Dolgon’s book reading and Q&A session. Dolgon was a gracious and affable host to a large group of friends, family, colleagues, mentors, and as he put it “new friends.”