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It was Harvard Arts weekend. So many great events, never enough time to see them all. The Harvard Jazz Band conducted by the fabulous Yosvany Terry; the Zuumba Singers at Sanders Theatre; a Pow Wow at the Lesley Lawn on Brattle Street. Harvard at its multicultural best.

Thursday, April 19

It's been a long time since we saw a glaring Whoopsism. (Def: gross misspelling) So imagine our surprise when we were in a local
Harvard Square Cafe (hint, shares the same pronunciation as "flower") and saw Eleanor Roosevelt's name misspelled.

Friday, April 20

Thanks, Flour, for heeding my tweet.

 

 

 

10th Annual Winter Carnival in Harvard Square
January 18th – March 30th, 2018

 

 

  A series of Homecoming events for alumni and staff of CHLS, CRLS, and Rindge Tech begin on Saturday the 18th and will run through Sunday the 27th.  Here's the schedule:

The whoopsism meter went on tilt today as we walked by the Cambridge Center for Adult Education.

 

 

Since it's a center for education, and it's a science event, we figure they know the reason for the offending "e".   

Times are changing in the checkout line.  Cash, credit, or debit?  Chip?

Credit or debit only.  Cash only (rare).

If we’re standing in line at a store and our noses aren’t buried in our mobile devices, chances are we take note of our fellow consumers as we go through the line.

Newly installed bike lanes on Brattle Street may prompt residents and visitors alike to rename it Brattle Street Parking Lot.

 

Instead of strolling down a tree-lined street with views of Radcliffe Yard and stately homes, what you first see from the west side of the street is two rows of parked cars.  As of Tuesday, July 11, the two-way bike lane stretched to Mason Street, but plans call for it to end at Eliot Street. 

 

I am so p***ed!

Like so many of you, I’m diligent about always having cloth bags in my car.  I put on a smug face when I buy something in a less-evolved city and am asked “paper or plastic?”  In such cases I bring out a nice, clean, foldable bag I keep in my purse for such occasions.  I whip it out and shake it open so my fellow shoppers can see how environmentally aware I am. 

It’s written all over my face:  “I’m from Cambridge.  We are civilized.”

My  neighborhood is changing.  I’d say it was dying but I’d run the risk of sounding like the old lady in Harvard Square who spends all her time longing for the old days.  I’ll admit to the first but I’m nowhere near the second.  What I’m longing for is balance; a place where tourists and students will feel comfortable and townies can walk a few blocks to find the everyday conveniences we deserve